I come from Bamyan Province. Back there my family wouldn’t let me go to school, I used to get so angry, I’d cry watching other children walking to class in the morning.We left Bamyan because of the Taliban, but after we’d settled in Kabul it was still the same, my parents wouldn’t let me learn - my uncle was especially against it. Things changed when the CBEC (Community Based Education Centre) teachers came to our house and talked with my parents. After a few weeks thinking, they agreed to let me come.

Mrs Razia teaching an English lesson at Vahida's CBEC. Classes are taught using a technique known as accelerated learning. This intensive method compresses two years of primary school syllabus into one.

My uncle’s still very angry about this, he asks why I should go to school when I should be married already. But my parents think the wedding can wait, and that I should finish secondary school as well!

If my family ever changes its mind I’m going to try very hard to convince them that I should continue learning. I want to become a teacher.

Vahida is 15 years old, in her second year of accelerated learning at Balako CBEC. She is currently at grade three of the primary school syllabus.

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Girls, child labourers, or refugees fleeing the Taliban. These are the forgotten children who are being given a second chance to learn at our community schools in Kabul.
Country
'When the cameras leave, stay'. We’ve worked in Afghanistan since 1997, remaining throughout the Taliban regime, educating children who would otherwise be robbed of their chance to learn.
Video
Girls, child labourers, or refugees fleeing the Taliban. These are the forgotten children who are being given a second chance to learn at our emergency education centres in Kabul.